Personal trainer Brandon Hasick reveals how changing how he BREATHED has transformed his health | Daily Mail Online

by fitness journalist

A personal trainer has revealed how changing his breathing and taping up his mouth when he goes to sleep at night has transformed his skin, health and hydration levels.

Sports scientist and strength and conditioning guru Brandon Hasick, from Sydney, said while he had never given much thought about his breathing, when he went on a health retreat, he discovered he used to be a ‘mouth breather’. 

Mouth breathing, Brandon learned, is not always good for our health, as it can lead to us feeling dehydrated, tired and suffering from dry skin and a runny nose. 

The PT now breathes through his nose as much as possible – especially at night – and said it has changed his life. 

A personal trainer revealed how changing his breathing and taping his mouth when he goes to sleep at night has transformed his skin, health and hydration levels (Brandon Hasick pictured)

Sports scientist and strength and conditioning guru Brandon Hasick, from Sydney, said he used to be a ‘mouth breather’ but now tapes his mouth every night before sleeping (pictured)

‘I’m a mouth breather (or was),’ Brandon wrote on Instagram.

‘Until I went on Will Grant’s retreat, I never paid much attention to the way I breathed.

‘I have done Wim Hof and other conscious breathing techniques, but have never really paid attention to the other 23 hours and 45 minutes of my day.’

Brandon continued: ‘Turns out, I breathe through my mouth.’

Mouth breathing, Brandon (pictured) learned, is not always good for our health, as it can lead to us feeling dehydrated, tired and suffering from dry skin and a runny nose

Brandon explained that Will got him to ‘tape my mouth one night before I went to bed to see how I went’.

‘After panicking for about 90 seconds and thinking I wouldn’t wake up alive, it turns out I had an epic sleep and woke up without having to skull a litre of water,’ he said.

‘Even better, my nose was clear!’ 

Since then, Brandon explained that he has been taping up his mouth every night, enjoying great sleep and much ‘more moisturised’ skin. 

‘I’m sure it will take me a while to unconsciously breathe through my nose 24/7 given that I’ve been in this motor pattern for so many years, however, during sleep is a solid eight hours of the day in the right direction,’ he said. 

Since then, Brandon (pictured) explained that he has been taping up his mouth every night, enjoying great sleep and much ‘more moisturised’ skin

The benefits of nose breathing 

Nose breathing is beneficial because it allows your nasal cavities to:

– reduce exposure to foreign substances

– humidify and warm inhaled air

– increase air flow to arteries, veins, and nerves

– increase oxygen uptake and circulation

– slow down breathing

– improve lung volume

– help your diaphragm work properly

– lower your risk of allergies and hay fever

– reduce your risk of coughing

– aid your immune system

– lower your risk of snoring and sleep apnea

– support the correct formation of teeth and mouth

According to Healthline, nose breathing is far healthier than mouth breathing, because it is more natural and helps your body effectively use the air you inhale. 

Your nose is designed to help you breathe safely, efficiently, and properly, and it does this by filtering out foreign particles, humidifying inhaled air and producing nitric oxide, which can help to improve the oxygen circulation in your body.

The benefits of nasal breathing are myriad.

It allows your nasal cavities to reduce exposure to foreign substances, increase oxygen uptake and circulation, slow down breathing, improve your lung volume and help your diaphragm work properly.

Other benefits include it lowers your risk of allergies and hay fever, reduces your risk of coughing and aids your immune system.  

Many highlight the benefits of breathing through your nose, particularly during exercise, as it can lower your respiratory rate or the number of breaths you need to take per minute.

If you want to try practising nose breathing, many recommend trying alternate nostril breathing – where you block one nostril and breathe in and out the other – or deep belly breathing. 

Deep belly breathing involves taking slow, deep breaths in through your nose.

The goal is to breathe deep enough to fill your belly with air. 

This increases how much oxygen you take in, and may help slow down your breathing and heart rate. 

Hundreds who saw Brandon’s post said he had inspired them to try nose breathing, as they admitted they are definitely guilty of mouth breathing (Brandon pictured)

Hundreds who saw Brandon’s post said he had inspired them to try nose breathing, as they admitted they are definitely guilty of mouth breathing.  

‘I’m guilty of this and have slept awfully my entire life,’ one person commented.

‘Epic, how interesting, I’ll be trying this tonight,’ another added. 

Personal trainer Brandon Hasick reveals how changing how he BREATHED has transformed his health

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Add your comment

By posting your comment you agree to our house rules.

We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.

You can choose on each post whether you would like it to be posted to Facebook. Your details from Facebook will be used to provide you with tailored content, marketing and ads in line with our Privacy Policy.

This content was originally published here.

Share this article

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *