Female Bodybuilding Has a Long Tradition



Bodybuilding was essentially a male dominated sport for pretty long. But once women started turning their attention to the art, they mastered its demands pretty fast, as they have been doing in pretty much all professions.

The first female star in the bodybuilding firmament was Lisa Lyon, who was born in California, in USA, in 1953. Her alma mater was UCLA and she was quite interested in the Japanese martial art of Kendo.

Though she was very much interested in bodybuilding, one of the main reasons for her participation in women’s bodybuilding competition was the active encouragement she received from the bodybuilding champion Arnold Schwarzenegger. His judgment turned out to be accurate when she managed to bag the first prize in the women’s bodybuilding competition.

Another prominent star in the bodybuilding world is Rachel McLish, the first Ms. Olympia title holder in the international bodybuilding competition held by IFBB or the International Federation of bodybuilders. The Texas born woman rose to become an icon of feminine body perfection and was inducted in 1999 into the IFBB Hall of Fame.

Another name in women’s bodybuilding world is that of Australian Bev Francis, who started her athletic activity as a shot putter. She and Ms. McLish together acted in the documentary movie about women’s bodybuilding, named Pumping Iron II: The Women. She was considered over-muscular by the generally accepted standards of femininity and her entry into the sport gave rise to a lot controversy about the standards to be applied to female bodybuilding athletes.

Bev Francis, though she caused a lot of stir in the bodybuilding world, did not win the Ms. Olympia title, and was placed second to Ms. Lenda Murray who bagged the title in 1991. Ms. Murray continued her winning spree for eight more time. Her popularity had peaked by 2003, the year in which she won the title for the last time.

Other well known names in the field of women’s bodybuilding are Juliette Bergman and Mandy Blank. The former won the title in the Ms. Olympia competition of 2001 and the latter was a fitness professional competitor of IFBB. Ms. Blank’s body was not highly muscular and she followed a style that is in consonance with the more commonly accepted standards of female aesthetics.

There is also Monica Brant, a professional fitness competitor who was Ms. Jan Tana Pro Fitness Champion as well as Ms. Fitness Olympia Champion of 1998. And Sharon Leigh Bruneau is a Canadian model turned bodybuilder who became famous in the field and is currently pursuing an acting carrier.

Source by Roy Forchet

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Differential contractile response of critically ill patients to neuromuscular electrical stimulation | Critical Care | Full Text

During the 2-year inclusion period, 468 out of 3147 patients that were admitted to two ICUs within the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Fifty of these patients were successfully enrolled in the trial and randomised. Further information regarding the enrolment process has been published before [19]. For this sub-analysis, only patients receiving NMES (n = 21) were considered (Table 1).

Table 1 Baseline characteristics

In the 21 patients treated with NMES, a total of 1824 muscle groups were stimulated during the first 7 days of treatment. These stimulations were equally distributed between upper (n = 886) and lower (n = 938) extremities (p = 0.522). On day 1 of NMES, only 64.4% of stimulations led to a contractile response with a significant difference between upper (100%) and lower (41.7%) extremities (p = 0.001). This difference could consistently be observed until day 7 (Fig. 1a + b). Nevertheless, a significant correlation for contractile response between upper and lower extremities was observed (k = 0.687, r2 = 0.472, p = 0.001). Contractile response declined throughout the 7-day observation period from 64.4 to 25.0% overall. We similarly observed a decrease in contractile response for upper (100.0 to 58.3%) and lower (41.7 to 12.5%) extremities (Fig. 1a + b) (Additional file 1: Table S2b).

Fig. 1

Relative contractile response, electrical current and muscle strength during NMES. a Relative contractile response decreases between day 1 and day 7 without reaching statistical significance. b Upper extremities show a significantly higher response rate to NMES on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 in comparison to lower extremities. c Muscle strength and contractile response for all muscle groups separately. M. vastus lateralis shows the lowest response to NMES. d Electrical current required to elicit a muscle contraction remains unchanged between day 1 and day 7. e A significant difference in electrical current required to elicit a muscle contraction can be observed on days 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 when comparing upper and lower extremities. f Muscle strength increase for both extremities between first awakening and ICU discharge does not reach statistical significance. g The increase in muscle strength between first awakening and ICU discharge reaches statistical significance for lower extremities. All values are shown as median and interquartile range. Statistical significance was calculated via Mann-Whitney U test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test as appropriate. A p < 0.05 is indicated by “+” in b and e. ICU = intensive care unit; MRC = Medical research council

Relative contractile response, electrical current and muscle strength during NMES. a Relative contractile response decreases between day 1 and day 7 without reaching statistical significance. b Upper extremities show a significantly higher response rate to NMES on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 in comparison to lower extremities. c Muscle strength and contractile response for all muscle groups separately. M. vastus lateralis shows the lowest response to NMES. d Electrical current required to elicit a muscle contraction remains unchanged between day 1 and day 7. e A significant difference in electrical current required to elicit a muscle contraction can be observed on days 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 when comparing upper and lower extremities. f Muscle strength increase for both extremities between first awakening and ICU discharge does not reach statistical significance. g The increase in muscle strength between first awakening and ICU discharge reaches statistical significance for lower extremities. All values are shown as median and interquartile range. Statistical significance was calculated via Mann-Whitney U test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test as appropriate. A p < 0.05 is indicated by “+” in b and e. ICU = intensive care unit; MRC = Medical research council

Furthermore, the results showed that the proximal muscle groups overall are less likely to respond to NMES than the distal muscle groups (median [IQR] proximal 40.7 [22.5/60.4] vs. distal 75.0 [38.0/91.7] %, p < 0.001). This finding is evident in both upper (median [IQR] proximal 73.2 [42.1/88.7] vs. distal 79.1 [72.5/94.6] %, p = 0.047) as well as the lower extremities (median [IQR] proximal 8.3 [0.0/45.8] vs. distal 52.5 [3.6/87.9] %, p = 0.003). The M. vastus lateralis was the least likely to respond to neuromuscular electrical stimulation (Fig. 1c) (Additional file 1: Table S2b).

The threshold of electrical current that led to a contractile response did not significantly change between day 1 and 7 for all muscle groups taken together (median [IQR] day 1, 50.2 [31.3/58.8] mA; day 7, 45.3 [38.0/57.5] mA) as well as for upper (median [IQR] day 1, 47.9 [24.4/60.5] mA; day 7, 44.4 [32.1/57.9] mA) and lower extremities (median [IQR] day 1, 49.3 [41.8/57.3] mA; day 7, 45.9 [37.1/49.8] mA) separately (Fig. 1d + e). Nevertheless, there was a significant difference between the upper and lower extremities observable on days 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 with a higher electrical current mostly necessary in the lower extremities. The applied electrical current between upper and lower extremities correlated significantly (k = 0.710, r2 = 0.505, p = 0.002) (Additional file 1: Table S2b).

At first adequate awakening, all patients presented with significant weakness overall (median [IQR] 3.2 [2.5/3.8] MRC score) as well as for upper (median [IQR] 3.1 [2.4/3.8] MRC score) and lower extremities (median [IQR] 3.0 [2.9/3.8] MRC score) individually (Fig. 1c, f, g). Until discharge, an increase was observable overall (median [IQR] 3.5 [3.0/3.9] MRC score), for upper (median [IQR] 3.8 [2.9/4.0] MRC score) and for lower extremities (median [IQR] 3.8 [3.1/4.0] MRC score), while statistical significance was only reached for the lower extremities (p = 0.042) (Fig. 1f, g). Muscle strength between upper and lower extremities at first awakening as well as at discharge showed a significant correlation (first awakening k = 0.864, r2 = 0.746, p < 0.001; ICU discharge k = 0.751, r2 = 0.564, p < 0.001).

Using the contractile response cut-off value, 8 patients were classified as responders (> 50% contractile response during the first 7 days) and 13 were classified as non-responders (≤ 50% contractile response during the first 7 days). Univariate analysis revealed a significantly higher SOFA score in non-responders at admission to the ICU. Baseline characteristics were otherwise balanced including norepinephrine treatment (Table 2).

Table 2 Univariate analysis

When comparing the contractile response from responders to non-responders, we see a significantly greater proportion of stimulations leading to an adequate contractile response in responders (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] both, 83.7 [73.4/93.5] vs. 35.0 [20.2/44.2] %, p < 0.001; upper extremities, 91.1 [86.6/99.1] vs. 67.0 [40.9/74.1] %, p < 0.001; lower extremities, 77.7 [62.5/90.2] vs. 7.1 [1.8/23.2] %, p = 0.002), indicating that our cut-off value was sufficient in distinguishing between patients that respond well to those who do not (Fig. 2a–d). Interestingly, no decrease in contractile response over time was observed in responders as opposed to non-responders (Additional file 2: Figure S1). When evaluating contractile response for all muscle groups separately, we also observed a consistent, remarkable and significant difference between responders and non-responders. Furthermore, it became evident that except for the dorsal thigh and M. vastus lateralis, the difference in response between upper and lower extremities is only significant for non-responders (Fig. 2d). This difference in contractile response is also reflected by the electrical current that was necessary to elicit a contraction if possible at all, as it was significantly higher in non-responders overall (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 38.0 [32.8/42.9] vs. 54.7 [51.3/56.0] mA, p < 0.001) and for upper extremities (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 32.6 [30.6/37.3] vs. 54.7 [45.4/56.0] mA, p < 0.001). Interestingly, no difference in electrical current was observed for lower extremities (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 44.6 [31.1/46.1] vs. 54.4 [33.0/58.3] mA, p = 0.140) (Fig. 2e–g) (Additional file 3: Table S1). Muscle strength at first awakening showed no statistically significant differences between responders and non-responders in the upper extremities (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 3.8 [3.4/4.2] vs. 3.0 [2.0/3.4] MRC score, p = 0.145), lower extremities (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 3.7 [3.3/3.7] vs. 2.9 [2.4/3.9] MRC score, p = 0.630) and overall (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 3.8 [3.4/4.0] vs. 3.1 [2.1/3.5] MRC score, p = 0.282) (Figs. 2h–j and 3 a). At ICU discharge, a statistically significant difference in muscle strength can be observed with higher muscle strength in the upper extremities of responders (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 4.4 [4.1/4.6] vs. 3.3 [2.8/3.8] MRC score, p = 0.036), while in lower extremities (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 4.3 [3.5/4.6] vs. 3.6 [3.1/4.0] MRC score, p = 0.376) and overall (responders vs. non-responders median [IQR] 4.3 [3.8/4.6] vs. 3.5 [2.8/3.9] MRC score, p = 0.145) statistical significance was not reached (Fig. 2h–j and 3b).

Fig. 2

Relative contractile response, electrical current and muscle strength in comparison between responders and non-responders. Relative contractile response is significantly higher in responders as opposed to non-responders during the first 7 days after ICU admission a for both extremities, b for upper extremities, c for lower extremities and d for all muscle groups separately. Electrical current required to elicit a contractile response is significantly higher in non-responders as opposed to responders during the first 7 days after ICU admission e for both extremities and f for upper extremities, while no difference can be observed for g lower extremities. Muscle strength measured via MRC scored at ICU discharge shows significantly higher values in responders as opposed non-responders for i upper extremities, while not reaching statistical difference for h both extremities as well as j lower extremities at first adequate awakening as well as ICU discharge and h upper extremities at first adequate awakening. All values are shown as median and interquartile range. Statistical significance was calculated via Mann-Whitney U test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test as appropriate. MRC = Medical research council

Relative contractile response, electrical current and muscle strength in comparison between responders and non-responders. Relative contractile response is significantly higher in responders as opposed to non-responders during the first 7 days after ICU admission a for both extremities, b for upper extremities, c for lower extremities and d for all muscle groups separately. Electrical current required to elicit a contractile response is significantly higher in non-responders as opposed to responders during the first 7 days after ICU admission e for both extremities and f for upper extremities, while no difference can be observed for g lower extremities. Muscle strength measured via MRC scored at ICU discharge shows significantly higher values in responders as opposed non-responders for i upper extremities, while not reaching statistical difference for h both extremities as well as j lower extremities at first adequate awakening as well as ICU discharge and h upper extremities at first adequate awakening. All values are shown as median and interquartile range. Statistical significance was calculated via Mann-Whitney U test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test as appropriate. MRC = Medical research council

Muscle strength at first adequate awakening and ICU discharge for all muscle groups separately. Muscle strength difference measured via MRC score at a first awakening and b ICU discharge in responders and non-responders. MRC = Medical research council

The proportion of contractile responses to NMES correlated inversely with the applied electrical current overall (k = − 0.746, r2 = 0.556, p < 0.001) as well as for upper extremities (k = − 0.653, r2 = 0.427, p = 0.002). No correlation between electrical current and contractile response was found for the lower extremities.

The receiver operating characteristics analysis (AUC 0.962; p = 0.001) revealed that an electrical current of 50.1 mA elicits a contraction in responders with a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 84.6%.

Contractile response furthermore correlates inversely with the SOFA score at admission (k = − 0.544, r2 = 0.296, p = 0.011). A SOFA score ≤ 13.5 has a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 61.5% to identify responders (AUC 0.788; p = 0.03) (Fig. 4a, b).

Fig. 4

Correlation and ROC curve for contractile response and SOFA. Relative contractile response between days 1 and 7 correlates with a SOFA score. b ROC curve for SOFA score in patients with adequate contractile response to neuromuscular electrical stimulation. SOFA = Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment; ROC = receiver operating characteristics

Correlation and ROC curve for contractile response and SOFA. Relative contractile response between days 1 and 7 correlates with a SOFA score. b ROC curve for SOFA score in patients with adequate contractile response to neuromuscular electrical stimulation. SOFA = Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment; ROC = receiver operating characteristics

Contractile response to NMES presented no statistically significant difference in patients with electrophysiologically diagnosed non-excitable muscle membrane in comparison to patients with an excitable muscle membrane (non-excitable muscle membrane vs. excitable muscle membrane median [IQR] 44.2 [36.1/53.3] vs. 78.0 [42.5/88.7] %, p < 0.128).

This content was originally published here.

EMS Training Exercise in China

Bell Helicopter in collaboration with Shaanxi Helicopter Co. Ltd. (SHC) and Shaanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, announced today the successful completion of an Air Medical Services (AMS) training exercise in China. This exercise is an initial step toward developing air medical capability for the Implementation Program for a Joint Pilot of Aviation Medical Rescue launched earlier this year by the National Health Commission of China and the Civil Aviation Authority of China (CAAC).

“Together with SHC, we are excited to be leading the development of an Air Medical Services network in China,” said Jacinto Monge, Bell Managing Director for North Asia. “During the two-week event, expertise on best practices was shared through academic seminars and practical training using real-life simulations.”

With the support from Med-Trans Corporation, a leading US air medical service company, more than 50 people from Shaanxi Helicopter and the People’s Hospital participated in the exercise which covered aviation safety practices and culture, functions and responsibilities for medical transport, flight planning and decision making, crew resource management and flight physiology. In addition, an introduction to the cross-functional coordination among emergency response, medical care, dispatch and aviation was provided to create a safe and effective air medical network solution for China.

Research from The Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS) and ASCEND, has shown that air medical services can significantly reduce the mortality rate of patients and improve the outcome of treatment. At present, there are more than 1,200 civilian air medical helicopters serving 320 million people in the United States; China currently has less than 100 civilian air medical helicopters serving 1.4 billion people. China’s central government plans to build a modern healthcare system which will include an extensive air medical services network.

This content was originally published here.

3 EMS training survey takeaways: Bariatric patient care

EMS providers are increasingly challenged to provide care for bariatric patients – generally considered patients’ whose weight exceeds 350 pounds – and a comprehensive approach is necessary to ensure patient and provider safety.

EMS agencies need to serve bariatric patients with the right equipment and processes, using effective, patient- and provider-safe principles and delivery. Bariatric patients have the right to expect professional and timely emergency care, with consideration given to their unique assessment challenges, and providers have the obligation to deliver such care without risking their own health.

We surveyed EMS1 readers to determine how well EMS providers are equipped and trained for moving, assessing and treating bariatric patients.

We received more than 200 responses from paramedics (54%), EMTs (39%) and A-EMTs (7%).

Here are three takeaways from the survey about how well EMS is equipped and trained to assess, treat and transport bariatric patients.

1. Deficiencies in bariatric EMS training, equipment pose a safety danger

Despite the fact that bariatric patients make up more than 10% of calls for 58% of respondents, only 32% noted they are equipped with specialized bariatric patient transportation equipment on every call.

Another 31% of respondents noted they are only equipped with specialized equipment on some of their calls, while the largest number of respondents – 38% – noted they do not carry specialized lifting equipment at all.

When asked what area of bariatric patient assessment, treatment or transportation they wished for additional training in, the top choice was how to safely lift bariatric patients – the skill most critical to prevent provider injury – over patient assessment, treatment and interaction skills.

Put directly, 62% of respondents replied they do not feel equipped with training and equipment to safely transport bariatric patients. 

2. Clinical training on comorbidities, complications needed

In addition to provider safety concerns, our bariatric training survey revealed a gap in clinical training for assessing and treating bariatric patients. Over the past 12 months, 70% of respondents received just one hour or less of bariatric-related training of any kind (45% received no training at all).

Bariatric patients have pathophysiological differences in addition to size that may require specialized equipment for taking and monitoring vitals with accuracy. Availability was split amongst respondents, with 50% noting they have access to specialized assessment equipment at least some of the time, while the other half of respondents do not. Only 20% of respondents, however, have been trained to use that specialized equipment in the past year.

About 50-80% of respondents replied they have never received training in assessing vital signs, common comorbidities and presentations, airway management and post-surgical complications specific to bariatric patients.  

Though transportation takes considerable consideration when treating bariatric patients, understanding that being overwieght is often secondary to the patient’s primary complaint and training in common comorbidities and considerations can give providers an edge when it comes to diagnosis and beginning treatment.

3. Additional opportunities for bariatric training

The additional providers, specialized assessment equipment and bariatric specific patient handling devices required to safely assist a larger patient take finesse to deploy while preserving the patient’s dignity. As EMS1 Editor-in-Chief Greg Friese, MS, NRP, writes, “all patients, regardless of their size or chief complaint, need to be treated with respect and dignity.”

Yet only 20% of providers noted they had been trained in how to comfort and put bariatric patients at ease during their transportation in the last year. This presents an opportunity to include provider communication and courtesy in initial and refresher training on patient handling.

And finally, one more area to consider when developing a training plan: work with other municipalities and disciplines. Transporting bariatric patients often requires a team effort. Practicing with those who will aid you – or whom you will be called to aid – will allow everyone involved to familiarize themselves with the equipment each department has available, and to streamline approach, resulting in smoother, safer operations in the field.  

This content was originally published here.

EMS Training – the Best Way to Improve Your Core Strength | SIXPAD

Who doesn’t want to be fit? Have a strong core including a well-chiselled six-pack. Having your clothes fit you effortlessly. Being able to climb a flight of stairs without breathing like you played a 90 minutes Football match. Finally have that confidence to take on any task at work, go to the beach, and even talk to that guy/lady you have been admiring for ages. The list goes on and on as the benefits are countless. Bet you are already sweating because you feel you need to sleep in a gym to accomplish this. No need to worry, EMS training is your answer.

What is EMS training?

EMS training has become really popular recently. This explains why studios incorporating this technology have been popping out in London like mushrooms. But what is EMS training and how does it work? Is it a myth or reality? EMS (electrical muscle stimulation) was originally used in the Medical sector, specifically for patients who needed physiotherapy. Today, this technology is also used in the fitness industry.

During an EMS training session, your muscles are made to contract through stimulation from the electrical impulses of an external device rather than your brain during a normal workout. This means you build a strong core through this external stimulation, without having to do the traditional core workouts.

Why EMS training?

For a number of people, the most significant benefit of electrical muscle stimulation is convenience. We live in a fast-paced world in which some people struggle to find time to go to the gym. If that is the challenge you are currently facing, then this technology is your solution.

There is also a category of people who have the time but are either lazy to go to the gym or they are worried about the pain they will feel after the exercises. All you need is stimulation from SIXPAD devices to tone your muscles. This can be done while reading a book, watching a movie on NETFLIX and even in your office, it is that convenient.

EMS training is what we have all been waiting for to finally have that dream body. What other excuses have you got? Contact us now and start your training.

This content was originally published here.

Podcast # 27: Compensation for EMS Training Time – Fire Law Blog

It’s not every day that I get to meet one of the parties to
the lawsuits discussed here on Fire Law Blog. It is even rarer that one will agree
do a podcast to discuss their case. My now-good friend Jon Misewicz is not your
typical firefighter… or litigant. He began his career in the Fairbanks (Alaska)
Fire Department, then moved on to the Memphis (Tennessee) Fire Department, then
to the Anchorage (Alaska) Fire Department, and then back to Memphis Fire.

Jon is a terrific guy – highly intelligent – dedicated to the fire service – and down to earth. Listen as we discuss the FLSA lawsuit he originally filed back in 2010 on the issue of whether Memphis firefighters had to be compensated for attending mandatory paramedic training. By 2014, Misewizc v. City of Memphis had become the definitive ruling on the compensability of EMS training time for firefighters.

For those interested, here is a copy of the 6th Circuit’s decision:

Remember, the general rule is that training time is
compensable. There are six exceptions, and here is the breakdown for those exceptions:

Exception Regulations Voluntary Off-Duty
1 Training not directly related to employee’s job 29 CFR §785.27 X X
2 Independent Training 29 CFR §785.30 X X
3 Special Situations – Training like that offered by independent institutions of learning 29 CFR §785.31 X X
4 Training required by law for certification 29 CFR §553.226 (b) (1) X
5 Training required for cert. by a higher level of government 29 CFR §553.226 (b) (2) X
6 Personal time at fire academy 29 CFR §553.226 (c) X

Jon’s case dealt with exception No. 4, and to a lesser
extent No. 5.

Here are the key regulations we discuss:

29 CFR § 785.27 General.

Attendance at lectures, meetings, training programs and similar activities need not be counted as working time if the following four criteria are met:

(a) Attendance is outside of the employee’s regular working hours;

(b) Attendance is in fact voluntary;

(c) The course, lecture, or meeting is not directly related to the employee’s job; and

(d) The employee does not perform any productive work during such attendance.

29 CFR § 785.28 Involuntary attendance.

Attendance is not voluntary, of course, if it is required by the employer. It is not voluntary in fact if the employee is given to understand or led to believe that his present working conditions or the continuance of his employment would be adversely affected by nonattendance.

29 CFR § 553.226 Training time.

(a) The general rules for determining the compensability of training time under the FLSA are set forth in §§ 785.27 through 785.32 of this title.

(b) While time spent in attending training required by an employer is normally considered compensable hours of work, following are situations where time spent by employees of State and local governments in required training is considered to be noncompensable:

(1) Attendance outside of regular working hours at specialized or follow-up training, which is required by law for certification of public and private sector employees within a particular governmental jurisdiction (e.g., certification of public and private emergency rescue workers), does not constitute compensable hours of work for public employees within that jurisdiction and subordinate jurisdictions.

(2) Attendance outside of regular working hours at specialized or follow-up training, which is required for certification of employees of a governmental jurisdiction by law of a higher level of government (e.g., where a State or county law imposes a training obligation on city employees), does not constitute compensable hours of work.

(3) Time spent in the training described in paragraphs (b) (1) or (2) of this section is not compensable, even if all or part of the costs of the training is borne by the employer.

(c) Police officers or employees in fire protection activities, who are in attendance at a police or fire academy or other training facility, are not considered to be on duty during those times when they are not in class or at a training session, if they are free to use such time for personal pursuits. Such free time is not compensable.

If overtime issues concern you, please join us in one of our
upcoming FLSA classes to get the full story:

This content was originally published here.

Legendary Weightlifting Coach Glenn Pendlay Passes Away At Age 48

With heavy hearts, we are sad to announce that legendary American weightlifting coach Glenn Pendlay has passed away at the age of 48.

Multiple athletes and coaches heavily vested in the weightlifting community have been sharing their condolences for Pendlay on social media, who reportedly passed on the morning of September 5th, 2019. Last month, news about his battle with cancer was made public on the Weightlifting House podcast when he shared that he had been officially diagnosed with Stage 4 Metastatic Cancer.

Pendlay was a USA Weightlifting Level 5 Coachthe highest accreditation a coach can receive — and could be described as a legend in the USA Weightlifting community. He began formally coaching weightlifting athletes in the mid-1990s, and coached multiple athletes at the international level.

“You literally gave the shirt off your back for anyone who needed it and always put the sport of weightlifting first.” – Tom Sroka on Pendlay’s passing.

Outside of influencing hundreds of athletes throughout his career, Pendlay also played a major role in the growth of Cal Strength, helped MuscleDriver USA develop a “Pendlay” product line to improve weightlifting strength equipment and bring more athletes to the sport, and even had a barbell row variation named after him. Needless to say, Pendlay’s legend will live on for years in the sport of weightlifting.

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Strength coach and close friend of Pendlay’s, Tom Sroka, shared his condolences on his Instagram page writing,

Just got word of Coach Glenn Pendlay passing away early this morning. He lost his fight with cancer but left behind him a legacy not to be forgotten. Multiple times he was asked if he won the lottery what would he do, and his answer was always the same: Create a training center for American lifters so they can earn a stipend, train full time, and bring home some medals.

Well Coach you were able to do just that. No one has seen anything like what you created at MDUSA since the days of Bob Hoffman and York Barbell and a lot of lifters have you to thank for bringing the weightlifting to the forefront of the strength world.

Personally, I’ll never be able to repay you for taking a chance on me and bringing me into this sport all these years ago. I still am mad at you for ripping up check after check in my face when I tried to pay you rent for living with you. You literally gave the shirt off your back for anyone who needed it and always put the sport of weightlifting first. This one is going to sting for a while. Thank you Glenn for all you did for me and countless others throughout the years, now you can finally Rest In Peace Coach…

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Phil Andrews, CEO of USA Weightlifting, also shared his condolences on his Instagram page:

“I am sad to share the loss of an impactful individual in our sport, this time Coach Glenn Pendlay. Rather than his headlining achievements of Team MDUSA and Cal Strength, Glenn might be best remembered for his willingness to share knowledge and how the sport.”

The team at BarBend worked with Pendlay on multiple articles, and we were consistently impressed by his knowledge and love of the sport. We send our condolences to his family and loved ones.

Feature image from @strength_coach_sroka Instagram page. 

The post Legendary Weightlifting Coach Glenn Pendlay Passes Away At Age 48 appeared first on BarBend.

This content was originally published here.

Electrical Muscle Stimulation Benefits for Tennis Players

In this society in which we find ourselves, it is increasingly common to save the time we have. We do not have it infinite, and every day is an exercise of maximum use. Electro stimulators result from years of study, making it possible, without leaving home and effortlessly, to train muscles to improve a person’s physical condition, and for therapeutic purposes. If you are interested in knowing how an electro stimulator is used and electrical muscle stimulation benefits, read on as we will answer these questions and many more.

Electrical muscle stimulation benefits

The use of electro stimulators provides the Body with many benefits. One of the most recognized is that it increases the activity performed by the muscle. It makes the contractions of the muscle much more effective. Therefore, enhancing the effectiveness of the Body’s movement.

Sometimes, fatigue and fatigue comes from the mind itself. We have to coordinate to perform each of the movements, on the contrary, using this type of devices. We can perform more repetitions of each exercise, and the duration of it will be older. So, we will train much more and better.

One of the biggest advantages is that thanks to its compact size. It can be used anywhere, either sitting on the sofa, in bed or anywhere else. At the time you prefer, without waiting for good weather.

This type of exercise ensures that, in less time. We have results that are more in line with what we are looking for. So, it will save a lot of time, being able to use the rest for any other task.

Use of electro-stimulators

One of the most used techniques in the field of rehabilitation is electrostimulation, mainly because the person cannot move correctly. In any other case, it would have serious problems, as different muscles could atrophy. The result of recovery would be neither as fast nor as effective with these types of tools.

How does it work?

There are many functions that it fulfills, and many of which are used not only for therapeutic issues but also for those who want to improve their shape. It is an excellent muscle enhancer, eliminating contractures and increasing strength, as well as making them joints work better, without pain. Occasionally, there may be muscular atrophy because the patient has been bedridden for a long time since this process of deterioration is avoided with the use of electro-stimulators.

The electrostimulators have different frequencies to work in different functions. For example, the milder ones will serve to activate the muscle, slowing the muscular atrophy and therefore, making the person feel healthy. However, when we increase the level of strength of electrical stimuli will improve strength, endurance and other benefits for the Body will be obtained. It is essential in these cases; the regulation of this power is always from lower to higher. If a person applies a maximum intensity, it can have the opposite result than expected. So, it is better to go slowly not to end up injured.

How to place the electrostimulators?

In the event that we are performing a rehabilitation therapy, the advisable thing will always be that the electrodes are placed in that place of the Body that we feel the pain — having to review at all times, the indications that will appear in the manual that will come with the device. When we want to strengthen muscle strength, what we have to do is place it in two different areas.

Contraindications of electrostimulators

These electrical appliances also have several contraindications, since not everyone can use them. Within this field would enter those people who wear pacemakers, because it could completely modify the rhythm they carry. Nor can it be used by pregnant women or in extreme temperatures of more than 38 degrees. Nor can it be used with tumors or cancer, or when you have a wound in the area to work or varicose veins, as it can complicate circulation.

This content was originally published here.

9 Home Gym Equipment Tools That Cost Less Than $20

As I’ve written over the years, there’s no doubt in my mind a comprehensive fitness routine is essential for optimal health. It’s important to remember fitness is a journey and you never really reach the end of the road. I believe it’s important to take stock of where you are and then to create goals, allowing you to push yourself to new heights.

At the same time, it’s also important to listen to your body and be willing to be flexible with your routine as circumstances change. Exercise benefits your body in a number of ways, including building strong muscles, improving the efficiency of your heart and maintaining healthy bones.

Your brain also benefits from physical exercise as it increases brain derived neurotrophic factor, important in promoting the development of new brain cells and essentially making your brain grow larger. Exercise also alters the way damaging proteins are used in the brain and triggers genetic changes, helping to slow the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

A state of the art gym in your home may not be feasible, but if you can clear a 6-foot by 6-foot area, you may be able to successfully achieve your fitness goals at home using these simple and inexpensive pieces of equipment, each costing less than $20.

Four Foundational Pillars to All Fitness Programs Can Be Done at Home

There are four foundational pillars to any fitness program. It’s important to balance these four activities to enjoy antiaging effects, reduce your risk for injury, improve your performance and improve your ability to do everyday tasks. Flexibility training is one important component as it’s linked with increase range of motion, injury prevention and a reduction in muscle stiffness.

There are two types of flexibility training: dynamic and static stretching. Dynamic stretching means you’re moving as you stretch and is ideal as the core of a warmup routine. It activates the muscles you use during your workout, improves your range of motion and helps improve your body awareness.

Static stretches are held in a comfortable position, usually between 10 to 30 seconds. Many consider static stretching less efficient than dynamic stretching for improving range of motion, including sports activities or for daily living. For this reason, experts suggest using dynamic stretching to warm up and static stretching to cool down.

Balance is an activity during which you activate your core muscles for stability and control. These activities are often promoted for older adults to reduce injury and falls. However, athletes find balance improves performance, and research suggests it may also improve your cognitive performance. You can reduce your risk of having balance issues as you age by incorporating these exercises in your physical activity beginning today.

Regardless of your age or gender, strength training is integral to any well-rounded program. While many ignore it, fearing they will gain bulky muscle, you can put such worries to rest as muscle growth is controlled by your genes and food intake. Few have the potential to look like Mr. Universe.

In reality, strength training has mental, emotional and physical benefits. It may help reverse diseases triggered by a sedentary lifestyle, such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and osteoporosis, for example.

Aerobic exercise, also known as cardio, is likely the most common way people think of exercise. This involves maintaining an increased heart rate using any movement that fits this definition, such as kickboxing, swimming, hiking, dancing and jump rope.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity exercise for adults each week that can be broken down into 30 minutes five days a week.

Warmup and Flexibility Reduces Risk of Injury

While warmup exercises and stretches may be done without any equipment, these tools may help motivate you to include these important exercises and help improve your body position during the stretches. Improving your mobility can radically improve your fitness and improve pain relief.

Stretch strap — This tool allows you to perform isolated active stretching, going beyond your typical static stretch. According to Brad Walker, director of education at StretchLab, a Los Angeles-based company specializing in training and certifying experts in flexibility and stretching:

“[It’s] used to enhance flexibility and range of motion so you can bend, turn, reach and stretch with greater freedom of movement. The stretch strap allows you to use the leverage of the strap to go a little deeper into the stretch position and take your flexibility to the next level.

It can also be used on any muscle group in the body, so it’s a great stretch tool to compliment any workout, whether it’s running, swimming or working out in the gym.”

Foam roller — This little tool is used for self-myofascial release and has transformed what used to be a mysterious technique used by professional therapists and athletes to a practice you can do every day, at any level of fitness. Self-myofascial release is a term for self-massage releasing tightness or trigger points in the muscle.

By applying pressure you aid in muscle recovery and enable them to return to normal function, elasticity and health. These inexpensive therapeutic tools also increase blood flow through your skin and muscles, engage muscles to build strength and increase your range of motion. Discover how to use one appropriately in my previous article, “5 Foam Rolling Mistakes to Avoid.”

Cardio and Strength Training Improve Physical Function

Cardiovascular and strength training are both essential to your fitness program. Strength training increases load-bearing and improves your insulin sensitivity, reduces your risk of metabolic syndrome, lowers inflammation and reduces perimenopause symptoms in women.

Interestingly, strength training also improves your cardiovascular fitness, so the two work hand in hand. While strength training programs may incorporate fitness equipment, you can create a program at home done only with your body weight. Discover a simple and easy to do program in my previous article “No Time for the Gym Today? Try This at Home.” Here are a few helpful tools you may consider adding to your home gym:

Sliders — These gliding discs are about the size of a paper plate and can be used on different surfaces. Although they help with balance, as they change your surface into an unstable environment, they also recruit core muscles and develop stability in your entire body.

More immediately, you’ll feel the muscles in your inner thighs and underarms begin to fatigue as you work hard. The tool is very versatile and easily packed into a suitcase so you can use it on the go.

Jump rope — Brian Bott, certified functional strength coach and co-author of “Get With the Program,” believes jump ropes may be one of the most underrated forms of exercise. He says:

“When running, it’s very easy for motivated trainees to push to run further and longer at the expense of their form. This is what leads to many common overuse injuries you see with running. The jump rope, however, doesn’t allow for this. Once you get tired and you aren’t maintaining the right posture, you’ll mess up and be forced to rest.”

Ab Roller — In 1994 Don Brown invented the Ab Roller and changed the way people did crunches. His goal was to help his club members perform crunches properly and limit stress and strain on the neck and lower back. Twenty years later, the Ab Roller is still a popular exercise product.

Bott calls it “One of the only late night infomercial products that actually works.” As a beginner, it’s recommended you set up near a wall and roll out until you hit the wall, gradually moving further away as you become stronger to increase the difficulty level.

Resistance bands — These are often used by physical therapists as they are capable of giving you a full body workout without a machine or other equipment. You can use them at home, while traveling and even at work. Bands also help you increase flexibility, develop strength and isolate core muscles.

Each of these factors helps to improve your mobility, agility and coordination. You’ll find a fitness routine for your home gym in my previous article, “I’m With the Band: Mastering Resistance Band Workouts.”

Kettlebell — These are cast iron weights that look like a cannonball with a handle. They allow for ballistic movement and swinging motions you can’t get with traditional weights. The tool dates back to the 1700s, when they were used to measure grain at Russian festivals and vendors began swinging them to show their strength.

Kettlebells develop power in your hips, legs and glutes as well as strength, flexibility and stability in your back and shoulders. Different weights help to add resistance to momentum base movements and force muscles in your core to activate and stabilize. The handle is easy to hold so you won’t feel like it will slip easily.

Kettlebells can be used in high intensity interval training, allowing you to get an intense workout in a short amount of time. Research shows participants burn calories quickly and help users to improve muscle strength, postural reactions and reduce pain in your neck, shoulders and lower back.

Be sure to watch your form while using a kettlebell to reduce your risk for injury. I share a fitness routine for beginners through advanced in my previous article, “Build Strength and Power with Kettlebells.”

Balance Enhances Performance and Cognition

The importance of integrating balance into your fitness regimen is only underscored by the number of studies linking it to improve cognition and a reduction in injury. Researchers find a relationship between balance and cognition in participants who suffer cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease.

Other studies demonstrate an impact cognitive training has on balance and gait, reducing the risk of falls and improving memory and spatial cognition in healthy adults. These simple and inexpensive fitness tools help strengthen and integrate muscles important to your balance.

Swiss ball — This large oversized ball helps improve your balance and flexibility. Some coaches believe the exercise gives you a noticeable advantage over other tools. By adding instability, the ball helps recruit your major and minor muscle groups and also offers resistance placing extra stress to build strength and muscle power.

The ball can be used simply as a chair, offering you an unstable foundation against which you must balance. You can also use it as a foundation while performing other strength training exercises with bands or handheld weights. It’s important to use proper form so you don’t increase your risk of injury.

Magic Circle Pilates ring — These rings were invented by Joseph Pilates. The circles challenge the adductor muscles of your inner thighs and underarms and the abductor muscles in your outer thighs and upper arms and shoulders, depending upon how you hold and use the circle.

According to Vanessa Huffman, director of education for Club Pilates, some clients refer to the circle as “the torture device,” which she translates to: “It’s really good at turning up the volume on any move!”

Add the Nitric Oxide Dump

Your home gym workout wouldn’t be complete without using the Nitric Oxide Dump, which requires no equipment for beginners and may be used with light weight kettlebells as you gain strength and endurance.

The exercise takes no more than three to four minutes, one two three times a day. As a high intensity workout, it helps improve your mitochondrial health and slows down age-related muscle decline. The Nitric Oxide Dump releases nitric oxide into your bloodstream from epithelial cells, supporting healthy blood flow as your veins and arteries dilate.

In turn, this allows oxygen and nutrients to flow more freely. Nitric oxide also plays a protective role in mitochondrial health. Dr. Zach Bush developed the workout, specifically designed to stimulate the release of nitric oxide for muscle growth and much more. You can read more about this simple exercise and its benefits in my previous article, “Incorporate the Nitric Oxide Dump.”

The 25 Best Home Gym Equipment of 2019: Home Gyms, Dumbbells, More – Family Living Today

The 25 Top-Rated Home Gym Equipment Options for More Convenient Workouts

When it comes to the best home gym equipment, there is no such thing as one-size-fits-all. After all, some of us are looking for a semi-professional gym to set up in the garage, others just want a light workout for when they can’t make it to the gym, and still others are constantly chained to our desks with no time for home or gym workouts. In other words, we all want, and need, something different out of our home gym setup.

And that’s why we’ve pulled together this list, which takes you from $9 core sliders to pricey (but worth it) complete home gyms. There’s something here for everyone, whether you’re looking to save on your gym membership or just need a mat to protect your floor (or your knees).

This exercise ball from DynaPro is best-in-class, supporting up to 2,000 pounds of body weight without the threat of rupture. Additionally, it’ll self-deflate as a response to excessive stress, so you never have to worry it’ll pop mid-workout. We appreciate the thick PVC casing, which provides plenty of protection against sharp objects. And speaking of the floor, the sweat-resistant, non-slip material won’t slip out from under you, no matter how much of a sweat you work up.

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If you want all-in-one bang for your buck, this 4-in-1 home gym from HerculesGrip will do the trick. This economical fitness kit includes gym-grade fitness equipment, including an ab roller wheel, fitness jump rope, two gliding discs, and three resistance bands – a total body workout to boost your cardio, work your abs and core, increase your speed, and strengthen your legs, arms, and endurance.

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Let’s be real: You can’t always make it to the gym. For all those days you can’t, TRX offers this suspension trainer basic kit: a best-in-class training strap, suspension anchor, and door anchor, so you can work out anywhere. It’s a portable solution to burn fat, build muscle, improve flexibility, and increase your endurance – on the road, on the go, and anywhere you find yourself working up a sweat.

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Experience a total body workout with this adjustable incline bench from Weider Fitness. You can adjust it to horizontal or to a steep incline, to decrease/increase the amount of weight resistance; you can even add resistance bands to increase resistance up to 50 pounds total. The in-built cable-and-pulley system allows for greater range of motion and versatility, to provide one of the most multipurpose (and economical) workout benches on the market today.

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Dumbbells are a must for any serious home gym, and this set from Bowflex is one of the best. Each dumbbell adjusts in 2.5-pound increments (up to the first 25 pounds), climbing from 5 to 52.5 pounds. Adjustments are easy and quick, so you can easily switch from one exercise to the next, no matter how intense your workout gets.

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If you’re looking to up your resistance training workout, you’re going to love these gym-quality rubber tube bands from Fitness Insanity. There are five bands, each measuring 1.2 meters long and clearly marked with its equivalent weight, which you can use as standalone resistance bands or stack to achieve a maximum resistance of 150 lbs. Take anywhere, thanks to the included door anchor and waterproof carrying bag; two cushioned handles and ankle straps also included.

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If you find yourself chained to an office desk, or just having a tough time finding the time to exercise, you are going to love this under-desk elliptical from Cubii. It’s super simple to use – four screws, and it’s ready to place under your desk and pedal away a day at the office. Choose from eight resistance levels, to adjust and control the intensity of your workout, and track your real-time calories, RPM, strides, and distance.

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A key ingredient to a safe home workout, both for your body and your home’s floors, is a great exercise mat. Enter these economical, easily portable, interlocking foam mats: They’re the perfect choice for anywhere you’d like to work out, place your equipment, or set up a home gym. Bonus: They double as a great children’s play area, once your home gym equipment is put away.

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One of the best and most economical ways to work your abs at home? This ab wheel from Fitnessery, crafted of stainless-steel, non-slip rubber, and durable PVC: a convenient, easy-to-use wheel that works on any floor. As you roll out your workout, you’ll strengthen your core, sculpt abdominal muscles, and burn calories in the process.

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The 810XLT Power Cage from Fitness Reality saves time and money, offering a versatile home workout option. This home gym sports two chrome, dual-mounted safety bars and two chrome lock-on safety; each pair of bars can hold up to 800 lbs. and are adjustable to 19 varying height levels for a full range of workout positions.

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Build an instant home gym in any room with this large exercise mat: just unstrap, unroll, and get your sweat on, no matter where you are. The thick, double-sided design features professional-grade materials and high-density construction to form a shock-absorbing, joint-protecting landing pad so strong, you can even wear your shoes. Without voiding the warranty. Now, that’s durable!

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Little to no time for your fitness? Enter these super portable resistance loop bands, which promise great results, even if you have little time and even less space. Crafted from strong, resistant latex, these versatile and lightweight bands supercharge your arm, knee, thigh, and ankle workouts. It’s literally a gym in your pocket – anywhere, anytime you have the time, your workout will be there.

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In addition to your lightweight resistance bands, these gliding discs are some of the lowest priced and most portable workout equipment you can buy. Their function is simple: Place them on the ground, step on, and get gliding. The resulting workout targets the abs and core primarily, but offers strengthening, flexibility, and endurance training for the whole body, from chest to legs.

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There’s nothing wrong with old-school workouts and hard-core weight lifting – just ask this sweet little weight bench from Marcy Fitness! This high-functioning workout bench enables a full-body workout; just add free weights! From the comfort of your own home, you can get a great workout and build a better-looking physique, thanks to this hard-working bench (and your own hard work).

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Most exercise machines have endcaps to protect your floors, but those endcaps can only do so much – and then, your floor is history. Say goodbye to scratches, dents, stains, grime, and other issues – not to mention, damage to your equipment – with this fold-to-fit equipment mat. It folds to provide a custom fit beneath your machine, and its textured surface also helps keep your gym equipment in place, for the safest workout possible.

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If a desk elliptical isn’t your thing, maybe you’d prefer to get your desk-sweat on with an office exercise bike? With eight calibrated resistance settings, this mini bike makes it easy to strengthen your legs and burn calories, even when you’re stuck behind a computer screen. The magnetic resistance provides smooth and quiet function, so you won’t irritate your coworkers, and the 5-function display tells you your speed, calories, distance, time, and scan.

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BodyBoss was the world’s first portable home gym, and it remains one of the favorites. This sweet little system includes everything you need for a complete and total body workout: the patented Vector Fit base, resistance bands to customize the intensity of your workouts, handles (to substitute dumbbells), a collapsible workout bar (to substitute a squat rack and bar), limb straps (for cardio workouts and resistance boxing), and a door anchor.

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Supercharge your workout with the AB WOW 3000 from YouActive Sports. This ab carver/wheel roller is designed to get you ripped 3x faster than other ab rollers thanks to its two geo-balanced wheels, which allow you to roll in any direction, on any floor surface. Dual resistance bands add challenge to your workout.

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Flashback to the 80s (or stay firmly in today) with this exercise step – a simple but incredibly effective way to improve your cardio fitness while getting a great workout. Non-skid feet help keep the step in place as you move, working your lunges and hamstrings while boosting heart health. Attach risers for an even more intense workout.

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If you need something a bit more portable than the original TRX Suspension Trainer, give the TRX Go Gym a try. It’s the perfect choice for travel and on-the-go workouts, especially if you like to take your fitness outside. Build lean muscle and burn fat with this whole-body workout, in as few as 15 minutes a day. Now, you can sculpt, sweat, and tone anywhere your workouts take you.

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Take your fitness to the next level with this battle rope by FireBreather, a guaranteed good time and an even better workout challenge. These heavy ropes work your shoulders, arms, triceps, back, legs and abdominal muscles – often, all at the same time – while simultaneously super-charging your cardio conditioning. Build lasting power and speed, while having fun with your workout.

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If you’re looking for a serious home workout, look no further than this top-rated home gym. The EXM2500S comes loaded with 210 pounds of cast iron resistance, to stand up to the most demanding strength training workouts and routines: build muscle and define your physique better and faster. Thick DuraFirm™ pads provide superior lumbar support, affording ultimate comfort to prevent common lower back strain.

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The Power Press Push Up is a highly versatile, color-coded push-up board system designed to help you build upper-body strength, increase definition, and achieve your fitness goals. There are 14 preset positions, which help you achieve proper form while allowing you to mix-and-match various positions to design your own challenging workout. The oversized, cushioned, nonslip handgrips ease pressure on your wrists.

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If you want explosive arms, you want this arm blaster from Legendary Workout. This home gym addition isolates your biceps while helping keep your back and elbows locked in the right curling position: engage your arms better than ever before. Even better, the arm blaster enables you to perform bicep curls properly and with no pain or discomfort; the adjustable neck pad also boosts the overall comfort and effectiveness of your curling workout.

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Boost your workouts with resistance training, with these neoprene dumbbells from AmazonBasics. Not only does resistance training help build and tone muscles, but it can also influence the overall effectiveness of your workouts – burn calories, promote bone health, and increase energy levels, among other benefits. We appreciate that the dumbbells are color-coded for easy identification, even when you’re mid-workout and squinting through the sweat.

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