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Benefits of whole-body vibration training on arterial function and muscle strength in young overweight/obese women.

Benefits of whole-body vibration training on arterial function and muscle strength in young overweight/obese women.

Hypertens Res. 2017 May;40(5):487-492

Authors: Alvarez-Alvarado S, Jaime SJ, Ormsbee MJ, Campbell JC, Post J, Pacilio J, Figueroa A

Abstract
The early arterial dysfunction linked with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle heightens the likelihood of suffering from future cardiovascular events. Whole-body vibration training (WBVT) may improve systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) and muscle strength in pre- and post-menopausal women. However, the effectiveness of WBVT to impact the arterial segments included in baPWV is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of WBVT on aortic and leg arterial stiffness in young sedentary overweight/obese women. Thirty-eight young (21 years) overweight/obese women were randomized to WBVT (n=25) or a nonexercising control (CON, n=13) groups for 6 weeks. PWV, brachial and aortic blood pressures (BP), wave reflection (augmentation index (AIx)) and leg muscle strength measurements were acquired before and after 6 weeks. WBVT significantly reduced carotid-femoral PWV (aortic stiffness, P<0.05), femoral-ankle (leg arterial stiffness, P<0.01) and baPWV (systemic arterial stiffness, P<0.01) compared with CON. The reduction in brachial systolic BP (SBP), heart rate, aortic SBP, aortic diastolic BP, AIx normalized to a heart rate of 75 beats per min (AIx@75; P<0.01) and AIx (P<0.05) following WBVT was significant compared with CON (P<0.05). WBVT increased leg muscle strength compared with CON (P<0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between changes in relative muscle strength and aortic stiffness (r=-0.41, P<0.05). WBVT led to reductions in arterial stiffness, central BP and wave reflection in young obese women. WBVT may be an effective intervention toward vascular health promotion and prevention in young overweight/obese women (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02679898).

PMID: 28077859 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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